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Program Notes

In her early years, Mitzie Purdue became one of only nine women who were rice farmers, and the only one who did it on her own versus inheriting a farm from a deceased husband. During those years she also became president of the oldest Farm Women’s Organization.

 

IN CELEBRATION OF WOMEN’S HISTORY MONTH, Lesley was honored to welcome Mitzi Purdue as her guest. The listener is sure to be inspired and charmed by Mitzi’s stories of building a career centered on overcoming fear of failure. Starting her adult life as a young woman too shy to enter a room, Mitzi spent her first three decades not doing the things she longed for out of fear of rejection. Her delightful retelling of the experience that awakened her to the realization that acting from fear of failure is the ultimate guarantee of meeting that failure will speak to many women who have held themselves back for long enough. Redefining failure as the act of not trying and choosing to see every rejection as an invitation to say, “next”, set Mitzi on a path that led to writing, being regularly published and having her own television show. Mitzi revealed to Lesley that through all her phases of life, during which she was often the only woman in the room, she lived with a consciousness of wanting to open a way for the women who would come after her.

About Mitzi

Mitzi Perdue is the daughter of the co-founder and president of the Sheraton Hotel Chain, and she is also the widow of another business titan, Frank Perdue, the chicken guy who’s products are now sold in more than 50 countries. In her early years she became one of only nine women who were rice farmers, and the only one who did it on her own versus inheriting a farm from a deceased husband. During those years she also became president of the oldest Farm Women’s Organization. In her 30’s Mitzi had an experience that inspired her to follow her lifelong dream of becoming a writer, publishing and being on radio. This led to her having her own television show that was syndicated to 72 stations. She is also a longstanding member of Business and Professional Women.